ASL Voter Hotline

Welcome to the ASL Voter Assistance Hotline!
301-818-VOTE
(301-818-8683)

It is very important that you vote and we know that voting information can be confusing and unclear.  With the 2018 midterm election coming up in November, the hotline can provide resources on the voting process. You can ask questions and get answers — in ASL!  Volunteers will be standing by to answer any questions you have about voting. We encourage you to vote in the upcoming election, you can use our hotline to get more information if needed! If you care about your rights and want to support/be against certain issues, make an impact by voting for candidates who will support your positions/issues.

Bottom line: register to vote and participate in the next election.

 

You can also click on your state below to learn more information (from RocktheVote). Please make sure to confirm the information with your state department of motor vehicles (usually provided online). The NAD shares this information to encourage people to vote, and does not promote any political party.

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

FAQs

  1. Am I registered to vote?

You can check with your state election officials online. You can also check your status as a registered voter by checking the nonpartisan website. Use the dropdown menu to select the state where you’re registered to vote. Once you enter the relevant information, it will tell you whether your registration status is active.

  1. How do I register to vote? I have limited transportation – do I have to go in person?

You can register to vote online at vote.gov. The website will inform you if your state allows you to register online and you can start your online registration on that same site. If your state does not permit online registration, the website will let you know what the other options are and how to do it.

  1. I voted in the last election and can I still vote again this year?

Yes. You become an inactive voter if you have not voted in two consecutive federal elections and have not returned the post cards from election officials requesting that you verify your address. You can double check your status as an active voter by checking the nonpartisan website. Click the “voter registration” icon on the home page. Use the dropdown menu to select the state where you’re registered to vote. Once you enter the relevant information, it will tell you whether your registration status is “active” or “inactive.”

  1. I voted in a different state at the last election, is it okay to register in a different state for this year?

If you moved to a different state, you’ll need to re-register in your new state. See question 2 regarding how to register.

  1. Where do I go to vote?

You can find your polling place by entering your address on your state’s voter lookup page. You can also find your polling place by checking the nonpartisan website. Click the “find your polling place” icon on the home page then use the dropdown menu to select the state where you’re registered to vote. Once you enter your address, it will tell you your designated polling place. You can’t just go to any polling place, you must go to where you are assigned.

  1. Do I need to show ID?

ID requirements vary from state to state. You can find out your state’s requirements by checking the nonpartisan website CanIVote.org. Click the “valid forms of ID” icon on the home page then use the dropdown menu to select the state where you’re registered to vote. However, it’s a good idea to bring your ID just in case.

  1. What is an absentee ballot for?

An absentee ballot is a vote cast by someone who is unable to attend the official polling place in person. If you need to request an absentee ballot, the procedures vary from state to state.  You can find out your state’s requirements by checking the nonpartisan website.

  1. I’ve never voted before, how do I vote on Nov. 6th?

First, before anything, you must register to vote by your state’s deadline. You can check your state’s registration deadline. See Question 2 for how to register to vote.

Second, when you arrive at the polling place on Nov. 6th, you will wait in line then be directed to a table where volunteers will ask for your name. They will cross your name off a list and give you your ballot. You will then go to a voting booth to cast your vote. There will be instructions, on the paper ballot or on the voting machine. Once you are done, you will get a sticker saying “I Voted!”

  1. I can’t miss work to vote, what do I do?

Your right to vote during work time depends on what your state law says since it varies from state to state. You can find out what the law is in your state here: www.workplacefairness.org/voting-rights-time-off-work, scroll down the page, and click your state on the map provided. You might also be eligible for an absentee ballot – check to find out what the requirements are in your state. You can also take advantage of early voting if your state offers it.

  1. Do all polling places have interpreters?

The Department of Justice (DOJ) guidelines for Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) state that “to ensure that voters with disabilities can fully participate in the election process, officials must provide appropriate auxiliary aids and services at each stage of the process, from registering to vote to casting a ballot” and “officials must give primary consideration to the request of the voter.”[1]For instance, this includes visual instructions at the polling place. Or a person who uses ASL and is not able to access the written English questions on the ballot may request a Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) for assistance. You must request auxiliary aids and services in advance by contacting your state election officials. You can search for the officials’ contact information, click “election official directory” and select your state/county. From there, you will find the phone number and email to request services.

  1. I am living in a state that is different from my current driver’s license (i.e. college student), should I register to vote in this state or where my driver’s license is?

You can submit an absentee ballot if you are still registered in your home state but attending college out of state (see questions 7 and 8). Or you can change your voter registration to your college’s location. You can pick one or the other but you cannot be registered in both locations.

[1]U.S. Dep’t of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Disability Rights Section, The Americans with Disabilities Act and Other Federal Laws Protecting the Rights of Voters with Disabilities (Sept. 2014),  at 1.

Resources